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Saturday, 10 December 2016

Refugees housed by YOUR CASH have 'burnt down homes, attacked staff and grown drugs'

Asylum-ArsonGETTY
Asylum seekers have been accused of burning down taxpayer-funded homes.
G4S, one of three companies hired by the Home Office under the COMPASS contract to house asylum seekers across the UK, has told of an increased number of attacks on its staff by refugees in 2016 - a year that also saw the number of refugees it has housed rise by 13 per cent due to increased immigration and more arrivals from Syria.
G4S is currently housing 18,639 asylum seekers and says only a minority are causing the serious problems. 
The news comes as the Home Office announced last night it has ordered asylum accommodation providers to improve and increase their stock to meet an increase in demand, with record numbers expected to arrive next year. 
Ministers want those who arrive in the UK, many illegally, put up in more “suitable properties” while their claims are processed. 
The move could see Britain’s asylum bill, currently costing taxpayers £546.8million a year – or £1.5million a day – rocket. 
G4S revealed the arson and assault problem in written evidence to an ongoing Home Affairs Select Committee inquiry into the standard of asylum seeker accommodation funded by taxpayers.
Asylum-ArsonGETTY
Refugee charities have said the standard of G4S homes is not up to scratch
The report said: "A minority of asylum seekers display violent and destructive tendencies. 
"That behaviour at times manifests itself in attacks on our staff and damage to properties. 
"Assaults on G4S welfare staff or another service have increased and stand at 73 so far this year.
"So far in 2016, 14 properties have been seriously damaged by service users - usually through fire damage - rendering the property unusable and increasing the use of hotels.
"There were 162 cases of anti-social behaviour so far in 2016."
G4S also claimed that despite reporting incidents to the authorities, in the main the perpetrators were getting away with it.
The report added: "G4S reports each incident to the Home Office and or to the local police. In most cases no sanction is applied."
Asylum-ArsonYouTube
G4S says 14 properties have been destroyed by arson this year.
But, refugee support charities and organisations have given evidence to the inquiry saying the standard of accommodation offered by G4S is often so poor that it is the cause of friction between the firm and the people it is supposed to be helping.
Sandwell Women's Aid (SWA) said in its report to the inquiry it was inundated with complaints about the standard of housing.
The SWA report said: "The majority of the properties provided under the COMPASS contract have been of very poor quality.
"We have repeatedly raised concerns/issues of rats or mice infestations.
"In addition to this, we have had several issues around repairs, we have had stairs falls through, a ceiling fall in whereby there was a near miss - the client and a baby were in the lounge. 
So far in 2016, 14 properties have been seriously damaged by service users - usually through fire damage - rendering the property unusable and increasing the use of hotels.
G4S evidence
"We have experienced severe damp issues, boilers not working and housing officers stating they must wait 28 days for repairs.
"GP’s and any other relevant agency involved who are in agreement with SWA that these conditions are having a negative impact on their mental health, not mentioning their safety."
The report added that refugees had often been victims of trafficking, and problems occurred because they were not always told where they were being taken, triggering bad memories.
It added: "This can bring up anxieties around their trafficking experience, being "put in a van and not knowing where they are going. 
"SWA say that in their experience, it appears that the assessment team are not communicating with G4S. 
"We specially request that our clients, victims of modern slavery, are not dispersed from our safe-house into temporary accommodation (hotels), however, despite this, we are receiving letters stating clients will be dispersed to temporary accommodations. 
"In our experience and feedback from our clients as well as seeing the impact this has on our clients, this has caused further trauma to our clients, especially as hotels are a mixture of males and females.
"Again, the impact of this that we have visually seen ourselves has caused extreme negative impact on their mental health."
Cannabis-AsylumGETTY
An asylum seeker was coerced into running a cannabis farm according to SWA.
The organisation cited one disturbing case in an undisclosed area when a refugee in temporary housing was coerced into growing cannabis by local criminals.
The report addd: "Another example we have is when our male client, from the EU, was accommodated by the local authority and was terrorised by the neighbours to be involved in
cannabis cultivation in his flat.
"This was reported to the police, however, no actions were taken to my knowledge. 
"This terror continued for months and the client's flat was broken into and trashed, there was also a physical altercation. 
"In the end, client could not handle this any longer, as housing was refusing to re-accommodate him.
"Out of fear for his life, the client absconded." 
Once all evidence is received the committee will write a report setting out recommendations to the Home Office of how to improve the situation.
The Home Office has said it will carefully consider these recommendations before responding.
However, a spokesman said: "The UK has a proud history of granting asylum to those who need our protection and we are committed to providing safe accommodation while applications are considered. 
“The extended arrangements will continue to provide value for money for the taxpayer."
Express.co.uk contacted G4S to ask why there had been no prosecutions over the arsons.
A spokesman said in a number of cases asylum applicants had been arrested, but the CPS had refused to charge the individual suspects.

Schools told to prepare for new wave of child refugees: Education chiefs warn of pressure on system as more than 750 children are brought to the UK from Jungle in Calais.

Schools have been warned to get ready for hundreds more child refugees over the coming months following the closure of the Calais Jungle.
More than 750 children have been brought to the UK under the Government’s transfer scheme from the migrant camp.
Data from councils shows they have processed 200 minors in the last month, with schools having to find them places.
More than 750 children have been brought into the UK from the recently closed refugee camp in Calais, France  (pictured)
More than 750 children have been brought into the UK from the recently closed refugee camp in Calais, France  (pictured)

Local authority leaders have been told to expect more ‘in the high hundreds’ in the New Year.
Councillor David Simmonds, deputy chairman of the Local Government Association, said schools may be unprepared for the number of new arrivals.

He told Schools Week: ‘The Home Office has said we are expecting numbers in the high hundreds in the next few months. In my view there often isn’t enough support or information for schools.
‘We would like to see more rigour at the point of entry to the UK.’
Councils have been asked to find homes and schools for child refugees, but only 103 had volunteered to take part by May this year – meaning they are taking on most of the responsibility.
Earlier this year, members of the ATL teachers’ union expressed concerns that children with English as a second language required more resources than their peers. 
Councils have already processed 200 minors in the last month from the Jungle (pictured) and the Home Office has told local authorities to expect even more 'in the high hundreds'
Councils have already processed 200 minors in the last month from the Jungle (pictured) and the Home Office has told local authorities to expect even more 'in the high hundreds'
Alan Smithers, professor of education at the University of Buckingham, said: ‘The influx poses a major challenge. 
'Schools will be expected to bring them up to speed in English education, in most cases, not knowing their story, what they are capable of, or even their age.
‘They will make it even more difficult for schools to balance books.’
‘The Government should have organised transitional classes.’
One school, Southfields Academy in Wandsworth, South London, specialises in teaching migrant pupils and will take 22 children from the Calais camp.
The school has an ‘international group’ which usually has about 150 children supported across five classes, with pupils grouped on their grasp of English, not age.
Unaccompanied children have been brought to Britain either under the Dublin Regulation because of family links, or under the Dubs amendment that requires the Government to give refuge to youngsters stranded in Europe. 
In an update on The Jungle yesterday, immigration minister Robert Goodwill said: ‘We have been working with the French authorities to bring children eligible to come here.
Taking in the child refugees is part of the Government's transfer scheme, but local authorities are concerned that schools are unprepared to receive the chilren
Taking in the child refugees is part of the Government's transfer scheme, but local authorities are concerned that schools are unprepared to receive the chilren
‘More than 750 children have arrived. Many have been reunited with family members in the UK, while others are being cared for by local authorities across the UK.’
Following earlier claims by campaigners, Mr Goodwill insisted there has been no unexpected end to transfers from France since the closure of the camp in October. 
He said: ‘More eligible children will be transferred from Europe, in line with the terms of the Immigration Act, and we will continue to meet our obligations under the Dublin Regulation.’
A Department for Education spokesman said: ‘We work closely with local authorities to ensure that schools and those responsible for the care of unaccompanied asylum-seeking and refugee children receive the support and guidance they need.’
Amber Rudd: Taking in the "most vulnerable" migrants to UK
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FAMILY'S PLEAS IGNORED Police make grovelling apology to young girl who was repeatedly beaten and raped by paedo grooming gang.

Force dismissed her as a prostitute and instead focused on hitting stats for car crime, burglary and street robberies.

Their terrified victim, who was just 13 when the abuse began, was reported missing from home an astonishing 71 times.
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Detective Superintendent Nick Wallen led apology to rape victim
But officers ignored her family’s desperate plea for help and instead told them to keep a diary of her movements.
A shocking report into the failures has now revealed detectives in Keighley, West Yorks., were more worried about meeting targets.
They dismissed her as a prostitute and instead focused on hitting stats for car crime, burglary and street robberies.
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Arif Chowdhury escaped justice and flew to Bangladesh with his dad after detectives blunder/
Detective Superintendent Nick Wallen, who sat on the serious case review, said: “We as a force apologise to this young lady.
“As a senor officer, who has been part of the review into this, I apologise personally to her.
“It has been said in the report that we were far more focused on the targets being set down from the Home Office.
“If you were a senior officer you were being held to account for burglary figures and vehicle crime over and above the exploitation of the vulnerable.
“We were all driven by the same priorities.
“They are all very important, but are not as important as dealing with very vulnerable young girls who are being sexually abused by grown men.”
The girl was passed round by 11 men aged between 19 and 34 for more than a year before she was finally taken into care in May 2012.
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Former sex slave Karla Jacinto devotes her life to helping other victims
On one occasion she was repeatedly raped in an underground car park below a disused police station by five of the men who took turns to abuse her.
She told social workers what had happened once she was in care and the men, from Keighley, West Yorks., were all arrested.
But ringleader, Arif Chowdhury, 20, escaped justice and flew to Bangladesh with his dadafter detectives blundered again by releasing him on bail.
His henchmen are now serving a total of 133 years in prison. Chowdhury remains at large and according to one relative is "having the time of his life".
The report found social services and other agencies also missed key opportunities to save the girl from the clutches of her captors.
Social workers had "little grasp" of what was happening and showed a "serious lack of consistency in the support and co-ordination", the report concluded.